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Why the age of the Apple iPhone is well and truly over

Kaiann Drance presents the new iPhone 11 at an Apple event at their headquarters in Cupertino
Kaiann Drance presents the new iPhone 11 at an Apple event at their headquarters in Cupertino

In recent years, Apple has relied on bigger screens, facial recognition and sleeker designs to convince customers to upgrade to its new iPhones with astonishing regularity.

It worked: each year, Apple sold more phones, profits rose, and shares climbed upward.

This year, it was all about the cameras. The new iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro, unveiled at Apple's Silicon Valley headquarters on Tuesday night, have new camera designs that enable vastly-improved low-light photos for concerts, evenings and indoor scenes, wide-angle images, and slow-motion selfies (or, if Apple's neologism catches on, "slofies").

We are in the Instagram age, and cameras have become arguably the key selling point of new devices....

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